• IACCP 2016 SQUARESPACE HEADER

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Pre-Congress Workshops

Pre-congress workshops will be held on Saturday, July 30 at the Nagoya University Campus.

  • The pre-congress workshops are not included in the congress registration fees.
  • The registration will be confirmed on a first-come, first-served basis.
  • The workshop registration fee does NOT include lunch
  • The Congress reserves the right to cancel a workshop if there are less than 15 participants.
  • Registration deadline is July 18.
  • Workshops reaching maximum enrollment will be closed.

Workshop registration fees: JPY 4,000 (no early bird)

WS1: Teaching cultural psychology: Course design and learning activities
Organizers: Beth Morling (University of Delaware, USA),
Benjamin Cheung (University of British Columbia, Canada).

Read Course Description


Date: Saturday, July 30, 2016
Time: 13:00-17:30 (half day)
Venue: Graduate School of Education and Human Development, Nagoya University, Nagoya (access information)
Registration fees: 4,000 JPY
Organizers: Beth Morling (University of Delaware, USA), Benjamin Cheung (University of British Columbia, Canada).

Workshop summary:
This workshop is targeted at college and university teachers who are preparing to teach a course in cultural psychology or cross-cultural psychology. It will be appropriate both for instructors preparing a new course and those revising a previously taught course. The workshop will give instructors a chance to develop or revise their learning objectives focusing on both content and critical thinking skills. Instructors will experience, and then develop, activities that can help students achieve selected learning objectives. Throughout the workshop, instructors will learn about, and practice applying, evidence-based teaching techniques. Attendees who have taught the class before are encouraged to bring their syllabus to the workshop.

Timetable
13:00-14:00 Introduction of participants, overview of workshop, and identification of challenges. Participants will experience a number of techniques for engaging students.
14:00-15:00 Introduction to course design and to evidence-based teaching and learning.
15:00-16:00 Through small group discussions, develop ways to adapt engagement techniques (from Hour 1) to the cultural psychology course. Small groups will share ideas. The facilitators will also share some teaching activities, videos, and writing assignments that work well in the course.
16:00-17:00 Through small group discussions, discuss ways to adapt teaching and learning science (from Hour 2) to the cultural psychology course. Discussion topics will include ideas for for addressing and correcting misconceptions, how to avoid inadvertent stereotyping, how to accommodate diverse students, and so on. Small groups will share ideas. Final wrap up and reflective writing
17:00-17:30 Final wrap up and reflective writing

About the Presenters:
Dr. Beth Morling focuses on both undergraduate teaching and cultural psychology research. She regularly teaches courses on research methods, cultural psychology, the self-concept, and the teaching of psychology, and has published a textbook in research methods. She is a Fulbright scholar, having lectured and conducted research in Kyoto, Japan from 2010-11. She was the Professor of the Year (2014, Delaware State Award), an award from CASE and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. She has published a chapter on the Teaching Cultural Psychology in the Oxford Handbook of the Teaching of Psychology (Ed. by Dunn, 2015).

Benjamin Cheung is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of British Columbia whose research includes cultural differences in sleep, and how people reason (wrongly) about genetic behavioural causes. He has focused increasingly on improving the undergraduate experience at his institution, and has taught research methods and social psychology for several years. Before going into teaching, he was awarded the UBC Department of Psychology TA Award of Merit (2012), and the UBC Killam Graduate Teaching Assistant Award (2014, institutional award). He has published a chapter on cultural psychology in the SAGE Encyclopedia of Theory in Psychology (Ed. by Miller, forthcoming), and is the creator of the supplemental teaching materials for the textbook, Cultural Psychology, by Dr. Steven Heine.

WS2: Cultural neuroscience: Accomplishment so far and future directions
Organizers: Shinobu Kitayama (University of Michigan, USA), Shihui Han (Peking University, China), Michele Gelfand & Yan Mu (University of Maryland, USA)

Read Course Description


Date: Saturday, July 30, 2016
Time: 13:00-17:30 (half day)
Venue: Graduate School of Education and Human Development, Nagoya University, Nagoya (access information)
Registration fees: 4,000 JPY
Organizers: Shinobu Kitayama (University of Michigan, USA), Shihui Han (Peking University, China), Michele Gelfand & Yan Mu (University of Maryland, USA)

Workshop summary:
In this workshop, we will feature three “success stories so far” in the field of cultural neuroscience. These stories pertain to 1) culture and the self (Han), 2) the tightness/looseness dimension of culture (Gelfand & Mu), and 3) culture, society, and health (Kitayama). Each speaker will discuss a key question that had remained unclear or unaddressed with traditional psychological or behavioral measures alone, how the question was clarified and reformulated with some creative use of neuroscience measures, and how a new understanding(s) could be achieved to pave a way toward better and more comprehensive theories of culture and psychology. Neuroscience measures that are covered will include functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), electroencephalogram (EEG), and various biomarkers including indices of inflammation, cardiovascular functions, and gene expression. An emerging field of gene-culture co-evolution will also be covered. Both promises and challenges in cultural neuroscience research are discussed, and practical advice will be offered.

Timetable
13:00-14:00 Shihui Han
14:15-15:15 Michele Gelfand & Yan Mu
15:30-16:30 Shinobu Kitayama
16:45-17:30 General Discussion and Q&A

About the Presenters:
Shinobu Kitayama is Robert B. Zajonc Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan. He studies how cultural practices and meanings might influence the self, all kinds of mental functions including cognition, emotion, and motivation, as well as health and wellbeing. His recent work highlights the dynamic, recursive interaction between culture and the brain through genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Currently, he serves as an Associate Editor for Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. He was an elected Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences. He also is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Shihui Han is Distinguished Professor at the Department of Psychology and a principle investigator at PKU-IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Peking University, China. He investigates how sociocultural experiences shape neural mechanism underlying self-recognition and self-reflection and how these effects help to understand human social behavior. He also studies how the neural mechanisms of emotion understanding and sharing are modulated by social intergroup relationships. He is the founding chief editor of the journal “Culture and Brain” and an associate editor of “Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience”. He is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science.

Michele J. Gelfand is Professor of Psychology and a Distinguished University Scholar Teacher at the University of Maryland, College Park. Gelfand’s work focuses on cultural influences on conflict, negotiation, justice, and revenge; workplace diversity and discrimination; and theory and methods in cross-cultural psychology. Her work has been published in outlets such as Science, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Proceedings of the Royal Society B, PLOS 1, Psychological Science, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Applied Psychology, Annual Review of Psychology, American Psychologist, Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, among others.

Yan Mu is a postdoctoral researcher currently working with Dr. Michele Gelfand in the Social Decision Making and Organizational Science Program at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is from China and received her Ph.D. in psychology from Peking University in 2011. Her research mainly utilizes neuroscience approach to explore the role of culture in human social behavior. Specifically, she is currently interested in investigating how culture shapes individuals’ cognitive abilities, how culture influences individuals’ perceived norms and making decisions, how culture impacts the way we socially interacting with each other, how people acculturate into a new culture using neuroimaging techniques (e.g., EEG, fMRI, hyperscanning).


Access:
Nagoya University is located about 30 minutes from Nagoya Station on the subway line or about 25 minutes by taxi (depending on traffic).
From Nagoya Station take the Higashiyama Subway Line to Motoyama. At Motoyama transfer to the Meijo Subway Line (clockwise). Get off at Nagoya Daigaku subway station (Nagoya University), Exit 1. It costs 270 Yen.

There will be student volunteers between Nagoya Daigaku subway station and the venue on Saturday from 12:00-13:30 and 16:00-18:30 to guide to you the proper location.

If volunteers are not available, please follow these directions:

At Exit 1, turn to your right and walk up the courtyard about 200 meters. On your left you will pass two buildings, the first building is the School of Economics, the second building is the School of Letters. Walk past the 2nd building and turn left at the road.
Follow this road for about 150 meters, you will pass a Family Mart on your left about half-way and come to a T-intersection. Turn left here, the Department of Education is about 40 meters down on the left-hand side.

Nagoya University Campus

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