• IACCP 2016 SQUARESPACE HEADER

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PROGRAM

The full schedule of the IACCP2016 Congress is now available; links are below.

IACCP2016 Programme Changes
There are some changes to the printed version of the Congress Programme (correct as of Friday, July 29).
Download Programme Changes (PDF)


Final Schedule

Download Full Final Schedule (PDF)


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Program Outline – Nagoya University

Saturday, July 30, 2016 (These events are held at Nagoya University Campus)


Program Outline – WINC Aichi

Sunday, July 31, 2016 (Main Congress Venue WINC Aichi)

  • 08:50-09:00: Welcome
  • 09:00-10:15: Presidential Address
  • 10:30-12:00: Keynote Presentation
    Ed Diener University of Illinois, USA
    “A Cross-Cultural View of Well-Being”
  • 12:20-13:50: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 14:10-15:40: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 14:10-15:10: IACCP Early Career Award Winner’s Lecture
    Sylvia X. Chen, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  • 16:00-17:30: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 17:50-19:20: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 19:30-20:00: Taiko Performance

Monday, August 1, 2016 (WINC Aichi)

  • 09:00-10:30: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 09:00-9:45: Triandis Dissertation Award Winner’s Lecture
    Jia He, Tilburg University
  • 10:50-11:40: Keynote Presentation
    Peter J. Richerson University of California Davis, USA
    “The Evolution of Cultural Differences”
  • 12:00-13:30: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 13:50-15:20: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 13:50-15:10: State of the Art Lecture
    Toshio Yamagishi, Hitotsubashi University, Japan Cancelled
    “Taming Parochial Prosociality at the Time of Increasing Global Interdependence”
  • 15:40-17:10: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 17:30-19:00: General Assembly Meeting: IACCP Members

Tuesday, August 2, 2016 (WINC Aichi)

  • 09:00-10:30: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 10:50-11:40: Keynote Presentation
    Ying-Yi Hong, CUHK Business School at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    “Do Multicultural Identities Challenge Traditions or Create the Future?”
  • 12:00-13:30: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 13:50-15:20: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 13:50-15:10: Special Colloquium
    Hazel R. Markus, Stanford University, USA
    “Applying Cultural Psychology: The Significance of Interdependence”
    &
    Shinobu Kitayama, University of Michigan, USA
    “A Biological Extension of the Heart and Soul of Cultural Psychology”
  • 15:40-17:10: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 17:30-19:30: Conference Dinner Group 1
  • 20:00-22:00: Conference Dinner Group 2

Wednesday, 3, 2016 (WINC Aichi)

  • 08:40-10:10: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 10:30-12:00: Symposiums and Paper & Rapid Paper Presentations
  • 13:00-13:50: Keynote Presentation
    Junko Tanaka-Matsumi, Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan
    “100 years of research on the relationship between culture and psychopathology: Emic and etic approaches reappraised”
  • 14:00-15:30: Walter J. Lonner Distinguished Invited Lecturer
    Laurence J. Kirmayer, McGill University, Canada
    “Embodiment and Enactment in Cultural Psychiatry: From Neurophenomenology to Situated Practice”

Program Highlights

Presidential Address

Patricia Greenfield
University of California, Los Angeles, USA
“Social Change, Cultural Evolution, and Human Development: United States, China, and Japan”


Keynote Speakers

Professor Ed Diener
University of Illinois, USA
“A Cross-Cultural View of Well-Being”

Professor Ying-Yi Hong
CUHK Business School at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
“Do Multicultural Identities Challenge Traditions or Create the Future?”

Professor Peter J. Richerson
University of California Davis, USA
“The Evolution of Cultural Differences”

Professor Junko Tanaka-Matsumi
Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan
“100 years of research on the relationship between culture and psychopathology: Emic and etic approaches reappraised”


Walter J. Lonner Distinguished Invited Lecturer

Professor Laurence J. Kirmayer
McGill University, Canada
“Embodiment and Enactment in Cultural Psychiatry: From Neurophenomenology to Situated Practice”

Read abstract


Cultural psychology has flourished in the last three decades.Many forms of culture including those of nation and region of origin, race, gender, religion and social class have been analyzed, as well as many aspects of psychological functioning—self, emotion, motivation, cognition, relationships intergroup conflict, and power. The case for the idea that “culture and psyche make each other up” and for diversity in psychological functioning now rests on a solid foundation of theory and empirical work. Given these advances the time is right for an applicable and communicable cultural psychology that addresses some of our societies’ most pressing problems which often have cultural clashes as their root cause. The analysis of many of these problems still begins with an independent and WEIRD perspective in which behavior is explained in terms of preferences, goals and values of the individual. With examples from education, health and economic development, I will suggest that successful interventions in these domains can benefit from cultural psychology’s findings and insights about interdependence, i.e., behavior that is regulated through relationships and and involves being receptive to specific others, realizing expectations and obligations, and following culturally prescribed norms.


Special Colloquium

Hazel R. Markus
Stanford University
“Applying Cultural Psychology: The Significance of Interdependence”

Read abstract


Cultural psychology has flourished in the last three decades.Many forms of culture including those of nation and region of origin, race, gender, religion and social class have been analyzed, as well as many aspects of psychological functioning—self, emotion, motivation, cognition, relationships intergroup conflict, and power. The case for the idea that “culture and psyche make each other up” and for diversity in psychological functioning now rests on a solid foundation of theory and empirical work. Given these advances the time is right for an applicable and communicable cultural psychology that addresses some of our societies’ most pressing problems which often have cultural clashes as their root cause. The analysis of many of these problems still begins with an independent and WEIRD perspective in which behavior is explained in terms of preferences, goals and values of the individual. With examples from education, health and economic development, I will suggest that successful interventions in these domains can benefit from cultural psychology’s findings and insights about interdependence, i.e., behavior that is regulated through relationships and and involves being receptive to specific others, realizing expectations and obligations, and following culturally prescribed norms.

Shinobu Kitayama
University of Michigan
A Biological Extension of the Heart and Soul of Cultural Psychology

Read abstract


Cultural psychology was rediscovered during the 1980s and 1990s when many of us began to believe that cultural meanings and practices go quite deep “under the skin.” At the same time, we also took it for granted that the psychological processes that are shaped by culture must, in turn, dynamically reconstitute the cultural meanings and practices. Thus, Richard Shweder’s thesis, “culture and the psyche make each other up,” became the heart and soul of the field. It shaped and motivated the field during the 1990s, and our paper, “Culture and the Self,” provided some impetus to the research effort back then. It is only recently, however, that the field began directly addressing its original premise by adopting various biological measures (e.g., neuroimaging and assessment of biomarker). This biological extension of cultural psychology has made it possible to examine, both literally and on-line, how deep culture might go under the skin. Moreover, by empirically linking various biological indices to socio-cultural variables such as cultural norms, beliefs, and practices, the field has begun to address the mutual constitution between culture and the psyche in an expanded theoretical context that encompasses both eco-geographical history and human evolution. This effort has the potential of bringing culture into neuroscience, medicine, genetics, and other traditionally biological fields as an active element of relevant neurophysiological, genetic, and epigenetic pathways.


State of the Art Lecture

Toshio Yamagishi Cancelled
Hitotsubashi University
“Taming Parochial Prosociality at the Time of Increasing Global Interdependence”

Read abstract


Evolutionary theorists struggling with the puzzle of large-scale human cooperation generally agree that human prosociality is parochial, and the social mechanism (or social niche) to support parochial prosociality is small groups consisting of strong-ties in which negative reputational consequences of norm-abiding/violating behaviors yield a strong disciplinary power. However, the cost of maintaining the parochial social order in the form of opportunity cost is increasing in many corners of the world, and the social order provided by the rule of law is replacing parochial production of social order. Rule of law frees people from the need to depend for protection on strong-tie network, and allows individuals to seek better opportunities on their own initiative and at their own risk outside the parochial world. The resulting “individualistic” behavioral principles are often incompatible with parochial values and norms of prosociality (and their neuro-psychological foundations), as seen in the current controversy between communitarian and libertarian ethics in the West or conflicts between traditional community values and “immoral” “Western” values in non-Western societies. Bridging the cultural individualism/independence-collectivism/interdependence literature with the intuitive-deliberative prosociality literature, I believe, will provide a first step toward addressing the issue that the next generation of social scientists face in the coming world – the issue of how we take advantage of our evolved neuro-psychological endowment for parochial prosociality in designing social institutions (or, “culture”) that make us live without hating and destroying each other.


IACCP Early Career Award Winner’s Lecture

Sylvia X. Chen
Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Title: “Psychological Responses to Cultural Globalization: Bicultural Identities, Acculturation and Beyond”

Read abstract


With the advent of globalization, cultures become increasingly connected through communication, transportation, and trade. The growth of information technology, the speed of geographic mobility, and the expansion of international corporations expose many people to two or more cultures and facilitate intercultural contacts. Globalization has not only brought change to cultural dynamics, but also influenced the psychological processes of individuals being acculturated to norms, values, and practices of other cultures. Research has differentiated immigration-based versus globalization-based acculturation and shown patterns of cultural identification arising from these two types of acculturation experiences. Global Orientations reflect individuals’ feelings, thoughts, and behaviors in the process of multicultural exposure and contact, comprising Multicultural Acquisition as a proactive response and Ethnic Protection as a defensive response to cultural globalization. I will present a series of studies examining the antecedents and consequences of global orientations among majority and minority groups in multicultural societies and relatively monocultural contexts.


Triandis Dissertation Award Winner’s Lecture

Jia He
Tilburg University
Title: “The General Response Style from a Cross-Cultural Perspective”

Read abstract


Response styles have been studied since the 1950s, yet its psychological meaning and implications on validity of data are still under debate. Challenges in research on response styles such as the different operationalizations, lack of validity measures not susceptible to response styles, and inconsistency in their correction effects. My dissertation addresses these challenges by (1) integrating different response styles to a general factor, (2) establishing the nomological network of response styles with validity measures at both individual and cultural level, and (3) exploring the implications of response style effects in cross-cultural surveys. The main findings include that a general response style representing response moderation to amplification is confirmed; response styles represent valid individual and cultural differences; and their correction do not seem to change cross-cultural differences substantially. Implications are discussed.


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